Institutional & Commercial Projects

Hull Millwork has worked on hundreds of historic buildings across the country, including many National Register properties and more than 25 historic courthouse projects across the state.

Woodrow Wilson High School

Woodrow Wilson High School

Designed by the prominent Dallas architect Mark Lemmon, Woodrow Wilson High School opened in 1928. Created in the Elizabethan style, it was located on the eastern edge of the City of Dallas, and constructed as the most innovative, and certainly the most expensive, high school at that time.
In 2008, a bond program passed providing funds for a major addition and to correct many of the school’s most pressing needs, including preservation concerns. Hull Millwork retained and restored all of the wooden and metal windows to their original condition.

Woodrow Wilson High School

Designed by the prominent Dallas architect Mark Lemmon, Woodrow Wilson High School opened in 1928. Created in the Elizabethan style, it was located on the eastern edge of the City of Dallas, and constructed as the most innovative, and certainly the most expensive, high school at that time.
In 2008, a bond program passed providing funds for a major addition and to correct many of the school’s most pressing needs, including preservation concerns. Hull Millwork retained and restored all of the wooden and metal windows to their original condition.
Woodrow Wilson High School
Woodrow Wilson High School
Woodrow Wilson High School
Woodrow Wilson High School

Tarrant County Courthouse

Part of the Tarrant County government campus in Fort Worth, Texas, the Tarrant County Courthouse is a pink Texas granite building in Renaissance Revival style. It closely resembles the Texas State Capitol with the exception of the clock tower.
In 2012, Hull Millwork collaborated in a makeover of the clock tower and restored the western face of the clock, as well as doors and windows in the courthouse.
Tarrant County Courthouse
Tarrant County Courthouse
Tarrant County Courthouse
Temple Santa Fe Depot

Santa Fe Depot

This depot was built in Temple, TX by the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railway or its predecessor the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe. The original depot was a simple boxcar that was replaced by a small one-story building and, later, a two-story building.
The depot became the home of Temple Railroad and Heritage Museum and officially opened to the public on August 26, 2000. All of the interior and exterior millwork was restored by Hull Millwork in 2000.

Santa Fe Depot

This depot was built in Temple, TX by the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railway or its predecessor the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe. The original depot was a simple boxcar that was replaced by a small one-story building and, later, a two-story building.
The depot became the home of Temple Railroad and Heritage Museum and officially opened to the public on August 26, 2000. All of the interior and exterior millwork was restored by Hull Millwork in 2000.
Temple Santa Fe Depot
Temple Santa Fe Depot

Ashton Depot

The historic Ashton Depot (originally the Santa Fe Depot) was opened on March 1, 1899, in response to a growing demand for railroad service in Fort Worth. The Depot was listed both in the National Register of Historic Places and designated as a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 1970.
The original stained glass windows, barrel-vaulted ceilings, and marble floors are stunning. Hull Millwork takes pride in their part of the restoration project including work on the windows, doors and interior millwork.
Fort Worth Santa Fe Depot
Fort Worth Santa Fe Depot
Fort Worth Santa Fe Depot

Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross

In 2013, the Church of Christ the King in New Vernon, NJ, commissioned Leonard Porter to create 14 new Stations of the Cross paintings for the Wedgwood-blue nave in the 1960s brick church.
Porter at first analyzed the Colonial Revival building in New Vernon, with its Ionic portico and balustraded steeple. The interior pilasters and altar have Doric capitals, and mahogany bands top the white pews. With architectural designer Christine G. H. Franck, Porter decided on cherry frames designed like aedicula composed of Doric pilasters and cross finials (built by Hull Millwork, with water-gilded highlights from Cowood Gilders, Brooklyn, NY).
Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross
Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross

Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross

In 2013, the Church of Christ the King in New Vernon, NJ, commissioned Leonard Porter to create 14 new Stations of the Cross paintings for the Wedgwood-blue nave in the 1960s brick church.
Porter at first analyzed the Colonial Revival building in New Vernon, with its Ionic portico and balustraded steeple. The interior pilasters and altar have Doric capitals, and mahogany bands top the white pews. With architectural designer Christine G. H. Franck, Porter decided on cherry frames designed like aedicula composed of Doric pilasters and cross finials (built by Hull Millwork, with water-gilded highlights from Cowood Gilders, Brooklyn, NY).
Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross
Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross
Leonard Porter's Stations of the Cross